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SKIN TYPES: DRY SKIN



What is Dry Skin?

Dermatlas: Actinic Keratosis
Dry skin (xerosis)

Dermatlas: Actinic Keratosis
Dry skin (xerosis)

© 2001-05, Dermatlas

Dry skin is characterized by rough, scaly patches, itching and cracking. When the natural protective barrier of your skin is removed, by harsh weather conditons or environmental elements and toxins, the skin dries out. Rubbing and scratching can aggravate dry skin, causing more itching and inflammation and potentially leading to infection.


Common Causes
Dry skin is often caused by the weather. It can occur in the summer due to sun and wind exposure and it occurs in the winter due to cold outside temperatures and indoor heating. When the skin loses moisture it may crack and peel, or become irritated and inflamed.

Another cause is exposure to chemicals in soaps and cleaning agents in your home. Bath soaps, detergents, hot baths and showers can remove the skin's natural oils (sebum) and promote dry skin. Choose only natural cleaning agents in your kitchen, laundry and bathroom.


Natural Dry Skin Care Treatment
Addressing the environmental factors is the basis for a good skin care routine. There are some steps you can take for the prevention and treatment of dry skin.
  • Keep the temperature at a comfortable level in summer and winter.
  • Increase the humidity in your home or office with the use of a humidifier.
  • Protect your skin when using cleaning agents, solvents and other household detergents
  • Use natural cleaning products in your home
  • After bathing use a shielding lotion to protect your skin and keep the natural oils and moisture in
If you have any eczema associated with the dry skin, consult your dermatologist right away.



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